Introduction to Sociology

Course Content from Acrobatiq
Course Number: SOC101
Download Course Syllabus

Introduction to Sociology provides students with a strong foundation in the major concepts and issues of sociology, its applications in all sectors of contemporary society, and its basic methodology and role within education, politics, media, government, social institutions, and social inequality studies. The structure of social class is examined, with careful consideration of the impact of societal organizations and norms of behavior. This courseware analyzes the process of social change: its motivations, forms of expression, and pertinent areas of concern. All strata of society are studied to provide a balanced and comprehensive approach. The social equality concerns relevant to study of deviance, crime, the elderly, sexuality, and global inequality are examined in relation to major social institutions such as marriage, religion, and political life. Introduction to Sociology courseware, in this way, places the most current sociological scholarship in the context of the real forces that exert influence in our world today.

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3
college credits
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Self Paced
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Course Objectives

After completing this course, you will be able to:

  • View people's behavior from a sociological perspective, discover your own sociological imagination, and apply it to a variety of social problems and situations.
  • Discuss the development of sociology as a science and differentiate it from the other social sciences.
  • List at least five sociologists and their major contributions to the field.
  • Describe the three major sociological perspectives—Functionalist, Conflict, and Interactionist—and analyze human behavior applying these perspectives appropriately.
  • Explain the elements of a culture and how culture is different from society.
  • Explain the seven steps of the scientific research process and recognize appropriate research procedures in an experiment or an article describing research.
  • Explain the relationships between social structure, social stratification, and the consequences of social status.
  • List at least four universal social institutions and describe the characteristics of each.
  • Describe how inequality and other social factors contribute to social change.
  • Summarize the relationship between socialization and the family.
Topic Topic Title Module
1
Learning Strategies
  • Learning Strategies
2 Foundations of Sociology/td>
  • Foundations of Sociology Introduction
  • Module 1: An Introduction to Sociology
  • Module 2: Sociological Research
  • Foundations of Sociology Summary
3 Individuals in Society
  • Individuals in Society Introduction
  • Module 3: Culture
  • Module 4: Socialization
  • Individuals in Society Summary
4 Groups in Society
  • Groups in Society Introduction
  • Module 5: Social Interaction and Groups
  • Module 6: Society and Organizations
  • Groups in Society Summary
5 Race, Class, and Gender Inequality
  • Race, Class, and Gender Inequality Introduction
  • Module 7: Social Stratification
  • Module 8: Race and Ethnicity
  • Module 9: Gender, Sex, and Sexuality
  • Race, Class, and Gender Inequality Summary
6 Other Sources of Inequality
  • Other Sources of Inequality Introduction
  • Module 10: Deviance, Crime, and Social Control
  • Module 11: Aging and the Elderly
  • Module 12: Global Inequality
  • Other Sources of Inequality Summary
7 Social Institutions
  • Social Institutions Introduction
  • Module 13: Marriage and Family
  • Module 14: Religion
  • Module 15: Education
  • Module 16: Government and Politics
  • Social Institutions Summary
8 A Changing Society
  • A Changing Society Introduction
  • Module 17: Media and Technology
  • Module 18: Population and Demography
  • Module 19: Social Change
  • A Changing Society Summary
Final Exam
  • Study Guide Final Examination

There are no prerequisites to take Introduction to Sociology.

This course does not require a text.

StraighterLine provides a percentage score and letter grade for each course. A passing percentage is 70% or higher. If you have chosen a Partner College to award credit for this course, your final grade will be based upon that college's grading scale. Only passing scores will be considered by Partner Colleges for an award of credit.

There is a total of 100% in the course:

Unit Assessment Points Available
  • Topic Test: Foundations of Sociology
  • Topic Test: Individuals in Society
  • Topic Test: Social Interaction and Groups
  • Topic Test: Race, Class, and Gender Inequality
  • Topic Test: Other Sources of Inequality
  • Topic Test: Social Institutions
  • Topic Test: A Changing Society
70% of your course grade
Final Graded Exam 30% of your course grade
Total 100%

Final Proctored Exam

The final exam is developed to assess the knowledge you learned taking this course. All students are required to take an online proctored final exam in order complete the course and be eligible for transfer credit.

Learn more about Proctored Exams

Introduction to Sociology provides students with a strong foundation in the major concepts and issues of sociology, its applications in all sectors of contemporary society, and its basic methodology and role within education, politics, media, government, social institutions, and social inequality studies. The structure of social class is examined, with careful consideration of the impact of societal organizations and norms of behavior. This courseware analyzes the process of social change: its motivations, forms of expression, and pertinent areas of concern. All strata of society are studied to provide a balanced and comprehensive approach. The social equality concerns relevant to study of deviance, crime, the elderly, sexuality, and global inequality are examined in relation to major social institutions such as marriage, religion, and political life. Introduction to Sociology courseware, in this way, places the most current sociological scholarship in the context of the real forces that exert influence in our world today.

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