Introduction to Philosophy

Course Content from Acrobatiq
Course Number: PHIL101
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Introduction to Philosophy presents an overview of the meaning, history, types, and models of philosophical thinking and argumentation critical to a solid understanding of Philosophy and its relevance to contemporary life. Early modules introduce methods, components of logic and critical analysis. Additional topics tackle the problem of evil, the existence of God, the soul, science ethics, free will, morality and utilitarianism. The courseware includes exploration of Eastern religions, ideas of the "perfect society," theories of state and human rights, and the meaning of life.

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3
college credits
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Self Paced
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Course Objectives

After completing this Introduction to Philosophy course, you will be able to:

  • Identify the major philosophical controversies.
  • Evaluate the Socratic method and the basic principles of logic.
  • Evaluate the contributions of Descartes to the debates on the meaning of knowledge and existence.
  • Analyze the concepts of empiricism with reference to the theories of Locke, Hume, and Berkeley.
  • Analyze Kant's theory that experience is the result of sense data processed by the mind and relate it to modern cognitivism and constructivism.
  • Explore the concepts of structuralism and deconstruction.
  • Understand the main ideas of existentialism as a counter to Hegelian Absolute Idealism.
  • Examine some modern approaches to the debate on the mental-physical divide.
  • Compare the approaches of Kant, Nietzsche, and the pragmatists to the concept of knowledge.
  • Analyze the theories that see mental states as functional states and examine their implications.
  • Critically evaluate the concepts of free will and determinism.
  • Examine the cosmological arguments for the existence of God.
  • Compare theories that insist on universal values with those that argue that values are culture specific.
  • Critically examine theories that see the self as a self-generating process rather than as a static entity.
  • Compare Mill's and Marx's views on the relation between the individual and the state.
  • Examine the teachings of Taoism, Confucianism, Zen Buddhism and other Eastern influences on philosophy.
Topic Topic Title Module
1
Learning Strategies
  • Learning Strategies
2 The Philosophical Perspective
  • The Philosophical Perspective Introduction
  • Module 1: The Meaning of Philosophy
  • Module 2: Traditional Branches of Philosophy
  • The Philosophical Perspective Summary
3 Logic and Critical Thinking
  • Logic and Critical Thinking Introduction
  • Module 3: The Building Blocks of Logic
  • Module 4: Examining Arguments
  • Module 5: Making Arguments
  • Logic and Critical Thinking Summary
4 Religion and Ethics
  • Religion and Ethics Introduction
  • Module 6: Philosophy and Relgiion
  • Module 7: Free Will and Morality
  • Module 8: Understanding Ethics
  • Module 9: Applying Ethical Theories
  • Religion and Ethics Summary
5 Philosophy and Society
  • Philosophy and Society Introduction
  • Module 10: The Perfect Society
  • Module 11: Race and Gender
  • Module 12: Philosophical Issues in Science
  • Module 13: Philosophy of Art
  • Philosophy and Society Summary
6 What is the Meaning of Life?
  • What is the Meaning of Life? Introduction
  • Module 14: Traditional Approaches to the Problem of Life and Meaning
  • Module 15: Contemporary Responses to the Problem of Meaning
  • What is the Meaning of Life? Summary
Final Exam
  • Study Guide Final Examination
This course does not require a text.

StraighterLine provides a percentage score and letter grade for each course. A passing percentage is 70% or higher. If you have chosen a Partner College to award credit for this course, your final grade will be based upon that college's grading scale. Only passing scores will be considered by Partner Colleges for an award of credit.

There is a total of 100% in the course:

Unit Assessment Points Available
  • Topic Test: The Philosophical Perspective
  • Topic Test: Logic and Critical Thinking
  • Topic Test: Religion and Ethics
  • Topic Test: Philosophy and Society
  • Topic Test: What is the Meaning of Life?
50% of your course grade
Final Graded Exam 50% of your course grade
Total 100%

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Introduction to Philosophy presents an overview of the meaning, history, types, and models of philosophical thinking and argumentation critical to a solid understanding of Philosophy and its relevance to contemporary life. Early modules introduce methods, components of logic and critical analysis. Additional topics tackle the problem of evil, the existence of God, the soul, science ethics, free will, morality and utilitarianism. The courseware includes exploration of Eastern religions, ideas of the "perfect society," theories of state and human rights, and the meaning of life.

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