Introduction to Biology

Course Content from Acrobatiq
Course Number: BIO101
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Introduction to Biology is an introductory course in the biological sciences. Topics included are biological macromolecules, cell biology and metabolism, DNA structure and genetics, plant biology, evolution, an overview of the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems, ecology, and behavior.

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3
college credits
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Self Paced
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Science
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Course Objectives

After completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the chemical composition of cells and analyze the metabolic processes that happen at the cellular level.
  • Explain the structure and function of various cell types and their intracellular organelles.
  • Distinguish between mitosis, meiosis, and cytokinesis.
  • Compare and contrast the various patterns of inheritance.
  • Elucidate the various applications of genomics and biotechnology.
  • Analyze the physical structure and reproductive strategies of plants.
  • Trace and evolution of invertebrates and create a cladogram showing different classes of invertebrates.
  • Summarize the evolution of vertebrates as well as the evolution of modern humans.
  • Give an overview of the circulatory, digestive, excretory, sensory, and respiratory systems and describe their major functions.
  • Classify living organisms and assess their effect of the biosphere.
Topic Topic Module Objectives
1 Biology: The Science of Life
  • Introduction to Biology
  • Themes in Biology
  • Scientific Inquiry
  • Classify items as biotic (living) or abiotic (nonliving).
  • Describe the levels of biological organization.
  • Describe the flow of energy in biological systems.
  • Analyze different transport methods and their relationships to maintaining cellular homeostasis.
  • Analyze the process of DNA replication.
  • Relate the mechanism of natural selection to evolution at the population level.
  • Contrast the structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
  • Compare and contrast types of interactions and relationships between species within a community.
  • Describe how matter cycles through an ecosystem.
  • Relate experimental design to the process of scientific inquiry.
  • Apply the process of scientific inquiry to questions about the natural world.
2 Introduction to Chemistry
  • Atoms
  • Chemical Bonds
  • Water
  • Acids and Bases
  • Distinguish between atoms and elements.
  • Characterize the subatomic particles that make up atoms.
  • Describe the characteristics of isotopes.
  • Interpret molecular formulas.
  • Analyze different types of chemical bonds.
  • Relate the property of electronegativity to chemical bonding.
  • Analyze the properties of water.
  • Determine features that make compounds hydrophobic, hydrophilic, or amphipathic.
  • Categorize a substance as acidic, basic, or neutral based on the pH of the solution.
  • Relate hydronium ion concentration and hydroxide ion concentration to acidity, basicity, and pH.
  • Describe the role of buffers in living systems.
3 Biological Macromolecules
  • Biological Macromolecules
  • Introduction to Organic Molecules
  • Carbohydrates
  • Lipids
  • Proteins
  • Nucleic Acids
  • Describe the major characteristics of organic molecules.
  • Analyze the relationship of structure to function for different types of carbohydrates.
  • Describe general features of a lipid.
  • Analyze the relationship of structure to function for different types of lipids.
  • Analyze the function of enzymes.
  • Characterize the chemical structure of amino acids.
  • Analyze the relationship of protein formation to structure.
  • Recognize the diversity in the types of protein molecules.
  • Recognize how ligands affect proteins and protein functions.
  • Contrast the structure and function of the nucleic acids RNA and DNA.
  • Relate how the structure of ATP helps nucleic acids store energy.
4 The Cell
  • The Cell
  • What is a Cell?
  • The Cell Membrane
  • Membrane Transport
  • Describe the general characteristics of antibiotics.
  • Contrast the structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
  • Analyze the relationship of structure to function of cell membranes.
  • Analyze osmosis as it relates to maintaining cellular homeostasis.
  • Analyze different transport methods and their relationships to maintaining cellular homeostasis.
5 Metabolism
  • Metabolism
  • Energy
  • Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration
  • Pathways and Regulation
  • Describe the flow of energy in biological systems.
  • Describe the different types of energy.
  • Analyze catabolism and anabolism and the role of ATP in each type of reaction.
  • Relate the structure of ATP to the process of storing energy and then releasing energy while producing ADP.
  • Relate photosynthesis and cellular respiration to energy flow.
  • Describe fermentation as an anaerobic process.
  • Describe how specific organelles and structures facilitate photosynthesis.
  • Analyze the inputs to and outputs of the stages of cellular respiration.
  • Describe the relationship of metabolic pathways to the transformation of energy.
  • Evaluate regulation mechanisms of metabolic pathways.
6 Cell Division
  • Cell Division
  • Cells and Chromosomes
  • Mitosis
  • Meiosis
  • Analyze the relationship of structure to function of chromosomes.
  • Associate different cellular activities to phases of the cell cycle.
  • Compare and contrast somatic cells and gametes.
  • Identify the relationship of parent and progeny chromosome numbers in mitosis.
  • Associate different cellular activities to phases of the cell cycle.
  • Describe the purpose of mitosis and each of its phases.
  • Identify the relationship of parent and progeny chromosome numbers in meiosis.
  • Describe the purpose of meiosis and each of its stages.
  • Compare and contrast mitosis and meiosis in regards to their overall functions, steps of the processes, number of progeny cells, and number of genes (haploid vs. diploid).
7 Classical Genetics
  • Classical Genetics
  • Heredity
  • Non-Mendelian Inheritance
  • Human Inheritance
  • Interpret the results of dihybrid crosses.
  • Describe the Law of Independent Assortment.
  • Distinguish between genotype and phenotype.
  • Describe the Law of Segregation.
  • Analyze allele dispersion during meiosis as it relates gamete production.
  • Interpret the results of monohybird crosses.
  • Interpret the results of crosses involving incomplete dominance.
  • Describe multifactorial traits that are dictated by genetics and the environment.
  • Interpret the results of crosses involving codominance.
  • Describe traits that are determined by polygenic inheritance.
  • Analyze a pedigree to determine inheritance patterns.
  • Distinguish autosomal and sex-linked patterns of inheritance.
  • Identify how changes in chromosome number lead to disorders.
8 Molecular Genetics
  • Molecular Genetics
  • DNA Function
  • Gene Expression
  • Gene Regulati
  • on
  • Biotechnology
  • Recognize Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is the artificial process of DNA replication.
  • Analyze the process of DNA replication.
  • Analyze translation with respect to molecular requirements, cellular location, and product.
  • Analyze transcription with respect to molecular requirements, cellular location, and product.
  • Describe how a change in the DNA code may affect phenotype.
  • Describe the central dogma of molecular biology.
  • Recognize how the environment may influence phenotype.
  • Compare characteristics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes.
  • Describe how bacteria control gene expression using operons.
  • Describe the functions of gene codes for a protein.
  • Describe how restriction enzymes are used to make recombinant plasmid.
  • Describe the translation of genetically modified plasmid.
  • Describe the process for making genetically modified plasmid.
9 Plants
  • Plants
  • Plant Structure and Growth
  • Plant Nutrition and Response to Stimuli
  • Plant Reproduction
  • Describe the structure and functions of plant organs.
  • Compare and contrast primary and secondary plant growth.
  • Identify different types of plants.
  • Identify plant cell types, tissues, tissue systems, and organs.
  • Describe how plants respond to environmental factors.
  • Describe the role of each plant hormone and how these hormones interact.
  • Explain how plants obtain and move nutrients.
  • Outline alternation of generations.
  • Identify stages of life cycles in different plant types.
  • Identify plant cell types, tissues, tissue systems, and organs.
10 Principles of Evolution
  • Principles of Evolution
  • Microevolution Continue
  • Macroevolution
  • Compare mechanisms that change the gene pool in a population.
  • Relate how mechanisms change the structure of the gene pool that causes microevolution.
  • Compare allopatric and sympatric speciation.
  • Describe how phylogenetics shows evidence for evolution.
  • Relate biological lineage to macroevolution.
11 Animal Evolution
  • Animal Evolution
  • Invertebrates and Vertebrates
  • Human Evolution
  • Describe salient structural features of invertebrates.
  • Compare characteristics common to related animals.
  • Describe the major evolutionary innovations that distinguish the fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals.
  • Describe the five general characteristics of animals.
  • Describe the course of hominid evolution.
  • Identify impacts of geography and migration on human evolution.
12 The Human Body
  • The Human Body
  • Tissues of the Human Body
  • Organ Systems: Transfer of Fluid and Exchange with the Environment
  • Organ Systems: Control and Regulation
  • Organ Systems: Structure, Support, and Protection
  • Growth and Reproduction
  • Identify various major cavities and regions.
  • Identify characteristics that differentiate the four categories of tissue by structure and function.
  • Describe the main respiratory system structures and functions.
  • Describe the main digestive system structures and functions.
  • Describe the main lymphatic system structures and functions.
  • Describe the main renal system structures and functions.
  • Describe the main cardiovascular system structures and functions.
  • Explain the four vital functions to which the organ systems can contribute.
  • Describe the main endocrine system structures and functions.
  • Describe the structure and functions of the special senses.
  • Describe the main nervous system structures and functions.
  • Describe the main skeletal system structures and functions.
  • Describe the main muscular system structures and functions.
  • Describe the main integumentary system structures and functions.
  • Identify the main structures and functions of the female reproductive system.
  • Describe the stages of postnatal development.
  • Identify the main structures and functions of the male reproductive system.
  • Describe the stages of prenatal development.
13 Ecology
  • What is Ecology?
  • Populations
  • Communities
  • Ecosystems
  • Human Impact
  • Analyze changes in populations.
  • Compare and contrast types of interactions and relationships between species within a community.
  • Distinguish characteristics of an ecological community.
  • Identify different types of learned behavior.
  • Define communication and describe different modes of social animal communication.
  • Classify items as biotic (living) or abiotic (nonliving).
  • Describe how matter cycles through an ecosystem.
  • Describe how energy flows through an ecosystem.
  • Recognize the trophic levels in an ecosystem.
  • Describe factors impacting global climate change.
  • Describe human activities that significantly impact the environment.
  • Recognize major threats to biodiversity.
  • Distinguish factors related to human population size that impact the environment.
14 Review and Final
  • Review, Study Guide and Final Exam

There are no prerequisites to take Introduction to Biology

All materials required for this course are now integrated to the learning management system and course environment. Some text materials may even be downloaded for offline use.

StraighterLine provides a percentage score and letter grade for each course. A passing percentage is 70% or higher.

If you have chosen a Partner College to award credit for this course, your final grade will be based upon that college's grading scale. Only passing scores will be considered by Partner Colleges for an award of credit.

There are a total of 1000 points in the course:

Topic Assessment Points Available*
1 Topic Test
5.4%
2 Topic Test 5.4%
3 Topic Test 5.4%
4 Topic Test 5.4%
5 Topic Test 5.4%
6
Topic Test 5.4%
7 Topic Test
5.4%
8 Topic Test 5.4%
9 Topic Test 5.4%
10 Topic Test 5.4%
11 Topic Test 5.4%
12 Topic Test 5.4%
13 Topic Test 5.4%

Final Topic Test 30%
Total   1000

*The course assessments are broken into two categories: 13 Topic tests which carry equal weight and contribute to 70% of the course score and the Cumulative Final Examination which is worth 30% of the overall course score.

Final Proctored Exam

The final exam is developed to assess the knowledge you learned taking this course. All students are required to take an online proctored final exam in order complete the course and be eligible for transfer credit.

Learn more about Proctored Exams

Introduction to Biology is an introductory course in the biological sciences. Topics included are biological macromolecules, cell biology and metabolism, DNA structure and genetics, plant biology, evolution, an overview of the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems, ecology, and behavior.

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