February 2011

  • Why U.S. News Doesn't Get College Rankings Right

    Barry Lenson

    More Reasons Why U.S. News Doesn't Get College Rankings Right If you still believe that the college rankings in U.S. News are a useful tool for selecting a college, I direct your attention to “The Order of Things,” an article by Malcolm Gladwell that appeared in the February 14 edition of The New Yorker.  Over the years the U.S. News rankings have been widely criticized by many observers. (Heck, this blog has questioned them a few times.) But Gladwell’s article takes the criticism to new levels by pointing out the utterly senseless and arbitrary criteria that the U.S. News editors use to compare and rank colleges. This article is something you must read. But just to give you a small taste, here are a few of the compelling poin ...

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  • Spring College Fashion Outlook for Women

    Barry Lenson

    Spring College Fashion Outlook for Women After an especially harsh winter, female students are going to be pretty darn happy to ditch their parkas and put on polka dots. But what are the hottest looks going to be this spring? Here’s a mixed bag of college fashion predictions from fashion blogs coast to coast . . . Duke University’s Daily Fashion Blog predicts that sexy strappy sandals will be the have-to-have item on campuses once the snow disappears.  You can wear them in many colors. According to the Duke blogger, this kind of sandal will be hot because “it calls attention to your feet.” The College Candy fashion blogger says that you better get a purse that’s called a Jessica McClintock Mini Bark Embossed Bag. That n ...

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  • Why Do Students Plan to Drop Out of College?

    Barry Lenson

    “A detection model of college withdrawal,” a study of 1,158 freshmen at 10 American colleges and universities conducted by researchers at Michigan State University, has uncovered some pretty interesting reasons why college students drop out. Some plan to drop out because they lost their financial aid, for example, while others drop out when they come into a ton of money.  Here are some of the top reasons why students say they are planning to drop out  . . . Revieved an unexpected bad grade Became ill Had roommate problems Received a job offer Large increase in tuition/living costs Became clinically depressed Recruited by job or other institution  Now, that is a mixed bag of reasons for sure. And we also wonder how ...

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  • How American Higher Education Can Be Improved

    Barry Lenson

    How American Higher Education Can Be Improved StraighterLine Founder Sounds off on Education in Washington Post Blog In a recent post on his College Inc. blog at The Washington Post, Daniel de Vise asked StraighterLine’s founder Burke Smith to suggest some ways that American higher education could be improved. We encourage you to read the blog, but we’ve taken the liberty of summarizing some of Burke’s ideas for you here . . . If students declare bankruptcy, their student loans should be discharged.  That would encourage the growth of worthy colleges and reduce the growth of colleges that do not provide a good educational product. Accrediting agencies should evaluate individual courses, not colleges. That would ease the probl ...

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  • Hot Jobs and Opportunities for Working Women and Moms

    Barry Lenson

    Hot Jobs and Opportunities for Working Women and Moms If you’re a working woman or mother, you probably think that most employers prefer to hire men. Of course, there might be some employers who think that way. But the latest statistics from the U.S. Department of Labor tell us that American businesses and organizations are currently seeking educated women – and that their earnings increase with their level of education. To quote from the report: “For women age 25 and over with less than a high school diploma, their unemployment rate was 14.2 percent; high school diploma, no college, 8.0 percent; some college, but no degree, 8.0 percent; associate degree, 5.9 percent; and bachelor’s degree or higher, 4.5 percent.” So the me ...

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