Use Online Courses to Prepare for a Medical Career

Why Smart Students are Using Online Courses to Prepare for Medical Careers

Would you like to enter a profession that promises career security and growth in the coming years? If so, you would be wise to pick a medical career. Even in a time when job creation in America has slowed, the number of jobs in medical careers is growing fast – and if you have the right training, one of those jobs could be yours.

Why Are Medical Careers Booming?

There are many reasons why trained medical professionals are in greater demand today than ever before. Let’s take a look at three reasons . . .

  • America has an aging population – and older people demand more medical care. The U. S. Census Bureau reports that the number of Americans over age 65 increased from 34,992,000 in year 2000 to 37,888,000 in 2007. And as our population continues to age, the need for healthcare will increase even more.
  • Americans are using many new healthcare options. In earlier years, a family physician was the one source for most medical care. Today, Americans are visiting emergency rooms, stop-in emergency care centers, MRI centers, short-term surgical care centers, dialysis centers, physical therapists, chiropractors, and more. For dental care, options now include oral surgeons, implant centers, and cosmetic dentists. All these healthcare providers need trained staff – professionals who greet patients, process insurance claims, and assist in treatment. As a result, the healthcare professions are growing.
  • Changes in medical insurance have created a need for medical billers and coders and all professionals who can handle medical documents and paperwork. Every time a patient visits a care provider, forms must be submitted to insurance companies. The load of paperwork can be overwhelming for medical offices. Because the care provider does not get paid until paperwork is submitted correctly, the demand for medical billers and coders is booming.

And this is a good time to train! The Obama administration’s American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 has set aside $20 billion for training in the critical healthcare sector. So more government funds are becoming available to provide training in the healthcare fields.

Which Healthcare Careers Should You Consider?

Here are the medical careers that are growing fastest, according to these projections from the 2010-2011 Occupational Outlook Quarterly, published by the U.S. Government’s Bureau of Labor Statistics:

  • Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians – 14% Projected Growth by 2018. 328,100 people worked in this profession in 2008, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that their numbers will grow to 373,600 in 2018.
  • Dental Assistants – 36% Projected Growth by 2018 - 295,300 people worked in this profession in 2008, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that their numbers will grow to 400,900 in 2018.
  • Medical Assistants – 34% Projected Growth by 2018 - 483,600 people worked in this profession in 2008, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that their numbers will grow to 647,500 in 2018.
  • Medical Records and Health Information Technicians – 29% Projected Growth by 2018 - 172,500 people worked in this profession in 2008, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that their numbers will grow to 207,600 in 2018.
  • Nursing Aides – 18% Projected Growth in by 2018 - 1,532,300 people worked in this profession in 2008, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that their numbers will grow to 1,811,800 in 2018.
  • Pharmacy Technicians – 31% Projected Growth by 2018 - 326,300 people worked in this profession in 2008, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that their numbers will grow to 426,000 in 2018.
  • Radiologic Technologists and Technicians – 17% Projected Growth in by 2018 - 214,700 people worked in this profession in 2008, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that their numbers will grow to 251,218 in 2018.
  • Surgical Technologists – 25% Projected Growth in by 2018 - 91,500 people worked as operating room technologists in 2008, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics expects their numbers to reach 114,700 in 2018.

Source for all statistics: The 2010-2011 Occupational Outlook Quarterly, published by the U.S. Government’s Bureau of Labor Statistics.