Do You Have What It Takes for a Career in Engineering? Part 3

Environmental Engineers:

Use the principles of engineering, soil science, biology , and chemistry to develop solutions to environmental problems.

Must have a Bachelor’s degree in Environmental Engineering or a related field, such as Civil, Chemical, or Mechanical Engineering. Obtaining a license improves the chances of employment.12


Geological and Mining Engineers:

Design mines for the safe and efficient removal of minerals, such as coal and metals, for manufacturing and utilities.

A bachelor’s degree from an accredited engineering program is required. To work as a professional engineer, a license is also needed. Requirements for licensure vary by state, but generally require passing two exams.13


Industrial Engineers:

Find ways to eliminate wastefulness in production processes. They devise efficient ways to use workers, machines, materials, information, and energy to make a product or provide a service. Industrial engineers frequently end up with jobs in manufacturing.

Must have a Bachelor’s degree in Industrial Engineering.14


Marine and Ocean Engineers:

Design, build, and maintain ships from aircraft carriers to submarines, from sailboats to tankers

.

Must have a Bachelor’s degree in Marine Engineering, Naval Architecture, or Marine Systems Engineering.15


Materials and Ceramics Engineers:

Develop, process, and test materials used to create a range of products, from computer chips and aircraft wings to golf clubs and snow skis. They also help select materials and develop new ways to use materials.

Materials engineers must have a Bachelor’s degree in Materials Science or Engineering.16


Mechanical Engineers:

Design, develop, build, and test mechanical devices, including tools, engines, and machines.

Need a bachelor’s degree – a graduate degree is typically needed for promotion into managerial positions. Mechanical engineers who sell services publicly must be licensed in all states.17


Nuclear Engineers:

Research and develop the processes, instruments, and systems used to get benefits from nuclear energy and radiation.

Must have a Bachelor’s degree in Nuclear Engineering.18


Petroleum Engineers:

Design and develop methods for extracting oil and gas from deposits below the earth’s surface. Petroleum engineers also find new ways to extract oil and gas from older wells.

Must have a Bachelor’s degree in Engineering, preferably in Petroleum Engineering.19


Sales Engineers:

Sell complex scientific and technological products or services to businesses. They must have extensive knowledge of the products’ parts and functions and must understand the scientific processes that make these products work.

Sales engineers typically need a Bachelor’s degree in Engineering, combining technical knowledge of the products or services they are selling with strong interpersonal skills.20

Your Engineering Checklist

These are the important qualities that successful engineers demonstrate. Employers, in particular, key in on these skills and traits when making hiring decisions.21 Before pursuing engineering courses online or on-campus, you will want to ask yourself these questions:

1- Do you have good communication skills? Verbal and written?

2- Are you able to work well within a team?

3- Do you have a strong work ethic?

4- Are you motivated and willing to take initiative?

5- Do you have a flexible mindset? Are you adaptable under changing conditions?

6- Do you possess strong analytical skills?

7- Do you have strong computer skills?

8- Are good organizational skills?

9- Are you detail-oriented?

10- Are you a leader?

11- Are you self-confident?

12- Do you enjoy working with others?

If you answer yes to most of these questions, there’s a good chance that a career in engineering is an excellent match for your skills – and that you do have what it takes to earn your degree in engineering.


12 Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Environmental Engineers, 2012, p.1.
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/environmental-engineers.htm

13 Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Mining and Geological Engineers, 2012, p.1.
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/mining-and-geological-engineers.htm

14 Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Industrial Engineers, 2012, p.1.
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/industrial-engineers.htm

15 Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Marine Engineers and Naval Architects, 2012, p.1.
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/marine-engineers-and-naval-architects.htm

16 Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Materials Engineers, 2012, p.1.
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/materials-engineers.htm

17 Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Mechanical Engineers, 2012, p.1.
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/mechanical-engineers.htm

18 Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Nuclear Engineers, 2012, p.1.
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/nuclear-engineers.htm

19 Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Petroleum Engineers, 2012, p.1.
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/petroleum-engineers.htm

20 Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Sales Engineers, 2012, p.1.
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/sales/sales-engineers.htm

21 National Engineers Week, Engineering Statistics, 2012, p1.
http://www.eweek.org/AboutEngineering/EngineeringStatistics.aspx