Why Go to a Fallback School?

Barry Lenson

Why Go to a Fallback School?

If you are about to graduate from high school, you are probably relieved that the complicated and stressful process of applying to colleges in now well behind you. You sent in your college applications. You got your acceptance letters. And in a few short months, you’ll be packing your car and heading to colleges.

But here’s a question for you. Are you going to one of your top college choices, or are you one of the tens of thousands of American high school seniors who are heading off to colleges that don’t really excite them? It could be that through no fault of your own, you are planning to attend a college that doesn’t completely thrill you.

Of course, it could turn out that you will love going to a school that wasn’t at the top of your college list. But here are some sobering thoughts . . .

Your second-choice school will probably cost as much as the schools you really wanted to attend.  That’s another way of saying, they cost a blinking fortune. You are facing the prospect of spending $25K, $50K or more to attend a college you really don’t love.

Some lower-cost options could work better for you. One way is attend a less expensive college for a year or two, then apply to the schools that really interested you. What ultimately matters is the identity of the college where you earn your degree, not the name of the school where you spent your first year or two of college.

Other strategies could help you enjoy a fresh start at a college that really excites you. You could take college courses online at StraighterLine to build up your credentials, then get accepted into the schools that would have been a stretch for you in the past. Why shouldn’t you attend the college that you really wanted to?

So before you go to a school that won’t excite or challenge you, stop and think. There could be a better way.

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