What To Do If You Get Rejected from the College You Really Wanted to Attend

What To Do If You Get Rejected from the CollegeIf you got accepted to the college of your choice via early admission in December, congratulations! You are probably kicking back and smiling while your friends are waiting anxiously for their acceptance letters to arrive in April.

If you’re in that second category – sitting and waiting and waiting for your letters to arrive – I’d like to say congratulations too. Why congratulations? Simply because you have already done all the hard work. The standardized tests, tutoring sessions, essay-writing, asking for letters of recommendation – all that stuff is now in the past, and you are simply waiting for the good news to arrive.

But let’s suppose, just suppose, that you’re feeling a little anxiety now. (I’ve been a college student, a teacher, an SAT tutor and a parent too, so I have a sense of what high school seniors are going through at this time of year.) I’d like to assure you that things are going to be just fine after your college acceptance letters arrive.

Here are the reasons why . . .

Reason One – You’ve already beaten the odds and you are going to be accepted by a college that will be great for you. Don’t forget, you already whittled down your list and applied to a select group of colleges that will be great for you. To look at it from the opposite perspective, you have already rejected thousands of the “wrong” colleges. So the real task that you are facing is making a choice of one school from among all your terrific top choices. When you look at it that way, your success is already pretty much assured.

Reason Two – You have plenty of options, come what may. Students today are transferring colleges much more often than they have at any earlier time. There’s no stigma attached to transferring any more. So depressurize it. You’re about to embark on an educational journey, not sell your soul to just one college or university.

Reason Three – Even if you’re disappointed in your college options after those letters arrive, you can take a year off to regroup. There are many ways to spend a year productively. You can take a gap year to travel, or explore new fields of study or new colleges. You can work for a year and earn money to help pay for your first year of college.

Reason Four – There are more ways than ever before to start college. You can take online college courses right here at StraighterLIne, for example, then transfer the credits you earn to your college a year from now.

So relax . . .

You are going to find opportunities, not setbacks, no matter what letters you get in April. You are in control of your own life.

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