The New York Times Cites StraighterLine as a College Cost Innovator

Barry Lenson

The New York Times Cites StraighterLine as a College Cost Innovator

“As Wikipedia upended the encyclopedia industry and iTunes changed the music business, these businesses have the potential to change higher education.” – Tamar Lewin writing in The New York Times, August 25, 2011

“Online Enterprises Gain Foothold as Path to a College Degree,” an article by educational reporter Tamar Lewin the August 25 New York Times, serves as a clear indication that educational alternatives like StraighterLine are getting noticed by the mainstream press.

To quote from the article:

“Ryan Yoder, 35, a computer programmer who had completed 72 credits at the University of South Florida years ago, signed up with an outfit called Straighterline, paid $216 to take two courses in accounting and one in business communication, and a month later transferred the credits to Thomas Edison State College in New Jersey, which awarded him a bachelor’s degree in June.”

Okay we’re not too wild about being called in “outfit,” but nonetheless, the author has noticed that StraighterLine really does offer students a highly cost-effective way to earn college credits, and transfer them to their regular colleges.

No mistake about it – when an institution like StraighterLine offers students an innovative, cost-effective way to learn and cut costs at the same time, people are going to notice. The New York Times did, and other trend-watchers are sure to follow.

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