The Hard and Easy Ways to Transfer Credits

Barry Lenson

Easy Ways to Transfer Credits

Transferring credits from your old college to your new one ought to be pretty easy, right? You supply a transcript, your new school looks at it and awards you credit.  Right. But hold on . . .

The Hard Way

But as often happens in colleges, things get overcomplicated. Let’s look at the following explanation of how to transfer credits that I just yanked from one college’s website. (I changed the name of the college because I didn’t want to let the whole world know just how ridiculous it really is.) But here goes . . .

Students who enter The University of Antarctica with 13 or more credits (52 semester credits total) accepted in transfer are considered Advanced Transfer Students. The Core Curriculum will be adjusted for advanced transfer students as outlined below:
• Complete REL 300 instead of REL 100 and REL 200
• Waiver of Seminar requirement
• Waiver of State assessment requirement
• Waiver of the Critical Thinking Assessment
• Waiver of one Lifetime Fitness requirement
All Core Curriculum requirements not mentioned above remain unchanged. Waivers for Advanced Transfer are determined at the time of initial entry into The University of Antarctica and will not be granted for courses completed after initial enrollment.

Got it? Good thing the college waives the Critical Thinking Assessment, because if you were thinking critically, you wouldn’t be transferring to that college in the first place.

The Easy Way to Transfer Credits

The easy way is to take StraighterLine courses and then transfer the credits you earn to your regular college or university. You can get an overview of the process by visiting StraighterLine’s Credit Transfer page. Because StraighterLine works with ACE Credit, the process is easy. And if you are transferring credits to one of StraighterLine’s Partner Colleges, the process is even more straightforward and streamlined.

One caution: If you’re planning to take courses and then transfer the credits you earn to a college that you are already attending, be sure to speak ahead of time with someone in the registrar’s office to be sure that the credits you earn will be accepted.

There’s no point in taking a course and learning afterwards that your snarky, picky college won’t accept them, right? But it ought to work. I mean, you’re not attending the University of Antarctica, are you?

Related Posts

How to Make Sure Your Online Credits Will Be Accepted at Your Regular College
Getting Credit for College Courses
Don’t Get Stiffed on Credit Transfers
Only Accredited Colleges Offer Courses for Credit?

 

 

 

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