StraighterLine, a Higher Ed "Disruptor in the Making"?

Beth Dumbauld

In colleges today, 28% to 40% of students enroll in at least one re­medial course, but only 17% of students who enroll in re­medial reading and only 27% students who enroll in remedial math end up earning their bachelor's degree. As a result, too many unprepared students enroll in college and end up spending too much money on courses that lead to nowhere but a mountain of debt.

In comparison, StraighterLine students are well-prepared for success in an online learning environment, better understand what to expect in a formal degree program, and achieve higher graduation rates.

Higher ed consultant and commentator Lloyd Armstrong places a spotlight on StraighterLine and its ability to prepare students for success in a rigorous online environment in an article he wrote exploring StraighterLine's role as a disruptor in higher ed. In particular, he looked to StraighterLine's partner relationships with colleges and universities, including Western Governors University (WGU).

“In this partnership [with WGU], StraighterLine is clearly demonstrating that it can successfully provide certain kinds of remedial education for students who want to enter an online accredited degree program but who lack appropriate preparation, and can do so at very low prices that do not leave students with significant debt."

That’s the insight from Changing Higher Education, which highlights StraighterLine's ability to offer affordable general education courses to students in a low risk environment.

"...[StraighterLine] benefits its partner institution by lowering its graduation rate risk from unprepared and unmotivated students. Thus StraighterLine is providing a win for both the students and the partner institution. ”

Check out Lloyd’s post to learn more about StraighterLine as a disruptor in higher education, how we save students money, and why online education continues to expand educational access to both "underserved and overserved student groups."

Read Original Article at Changing Higher Ed


Previous Post Next Post