One Way to Avoid a $250,000 Medical School Mistake

Barry Lenson

Medical School MistakeOne Way to Avoid a $250,000 Medical School Mistake

How much does medical school cost?

According to About.com, the median medical school tuition in 2010-2011 was $28,685 at a public institution, and $46,899 at a private institution. But that does not include books, lab fees, and other costs. Again according to About.com, that’s why the real yearly cost of attending medical school in 2010-2011 was $49,298 at a public institution, and $66,984 at a private university.

How long does it take to get an MD degree after you finish college?

According to The Association of American Medical Colleges, becoming a doctor requires four years of medical school, followed by three to eight years of residency training in your specialty.

Granted, you’re not going to pay tuition during your residency – and you might even earn about $45,000 a year. But even if you only pay for four years of medical school expenses, those costs will add up to something in the range of $200,000 and $260,000, give or take. And of course, those figures don’t include rent, food, transportation, and other normal expenses.

How can you find out whether medical school is really for you without taking a financial bath? One way is to start out in med school, and then drop out if it isn’t working out. That will only cost you, say, $25,000 if you head for the door during your first semester of study.

Another option? If you are enrolled in college already, you can jump into a pre-med program of study and then change majors if you decide that a career in medicine is not right for you. If you realize that is happening and change majors quickly, that approach might not sink your financial ship.

Then there is another way – arguably the most cost-effective of all. You can, for about $999, take all of StraighterLine’s medicine-related courses online, and then decide whether you should make a full-time, total commitment to becoming a physician.

Here are some of the StraighterLine courses you can take for that low price, all of which can help you make the wisest decision about whether or not to apply to medical school:

  • Introductory Biology for Nonmajors - An introductory course in the biological sciences for the nonmajor student.  Topics included are cell structure and function, bioenergetics, DNA structure and function, cell reproduction, taxonomy, evolution, ecology, and an overview of the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. Transferrable College Credits: 3
  • Introductory Biology for Nonmajors & Lab - An introductory course in the biological sciences for the nonmajor student. Topics included are cell structure and function, bioenergetics, DNA structure and function, cell reproduction, taxonomy, evolution, ecology, and an overview of the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. This course includes an at-home lab component and supplemental assessments and exercises. Transferrable College Credits: 4
  • General Chemistry I – This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic principles of chemistry. The course begins with an analysis of matter and its components, stoichiometry, and intermolecular force and phase changes. Properties of liquids, solids, and gases are also explored. This foundation is used to examine solubility, colligative properties of solutions, chemical reactions, quantum theory and atomic structure, and chemical periodicity. Other topics include main group and transition elements. Transferrable College Credits: 3
  • General Chemistry I & Lab - Designed to familiarize students with the basic principles of chemistry. The course begins with an analysis of matter and its components, stoichiometry, and intermolecular force and phase changes. Properties of liquids, solids, and gases are also explored. This foundation is used to examine solubility, colligative properties of solutions, chemical reactions, quantum theory and atomic structure, and chemical periodicity. Other topics include main group and transition elements. This course includes an at-home lab component and supplemental assessments and exercises. Transferrable College Credits: 4
  • Anatomy & Physiology I - Provides a comprehensive look at the human body’s structure and functions. Topics include organization of the body, characteristics of life, anatomical terminology, how the body maintains homeostasis, the relationship of chemistry to anatomy and physiology, and cell function and division. The skin, skeletal system, muscles, and nervous system are examined. Sensory organs and the endocrine system are also presented. Several diseases and disorders are discussed, and as well as the cause, detection, and treatment of them. Students will also perform and complete content complementary at home labs with accompanying assessments as a lab component to this course. Transferrable College Credits: 3
  • Anatomy & Physiology I with Lab - Provides a comprehensive look at the human body’s structure and functions. Topics include organization of the body, characteristics of life, anatomical terminology, how the body maintains homeostasis, the relationship of chemistry to anatomy and physiology, and cell function and division. The skin, skeletal system, muscles, and nervous system are examined. Sensory organs and the endocrine system are also presented. Several diseases and disorders are discussed, and as well as the cause, detection, and treatment of them. Students will also perform and complete content complementary at home labs with accompanying assessments as a lab component to this course.  Transferrable College Credits: 4
  • Anatomy & Physiology II - Building on Anatomy and Physiology I, this course examines major parts of the body and how they work independently as well as together. The reproductive system is discussed as well as stages of human development. Students learn about the lymphatic system and the three lines of defense the body has against pathogens. Also explained are the cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, and urinary systems as well as nutrition, metabolism, body fluid balances, and aging. Transferrable College Credits: 3
  • Anatomy & Physiology II With Lab - Building on Anatomy and Physiology I, this course examines major parts of the body and how they work independently as well as together. The reproductive system is discussed as well as stages of human development. Students learn about the lymphatic system and the three lines of defense the body has against pathogens. Also explained are the cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, and urinary systems as well as nutrition, metabolism, body fluid balances, and aging. Transferrable College Credits: 4
  • Medical Terminology - Introduces elements of medical terminology, such as the etymology of words used to describe the human body. Students learn to apply proper terminology and spelling for major pathological conditions. This course identifies and explains the terms used for the integumentary, respiratory, nervous, reproductive, endocrine, urinary, digestive, lymphatic, hematic, immune, and musculoskeletal systems. It compares and contrasts the different body systems. Students define and describe the function of each system of the body. Transferrable College Credits: 3
  • Pharmacology I - Introduces pharmacology as the study of drugs. The course begins with an explanation of therapeutic and adverse effects, in addition to the basic operation of the nervous system. Then, several body systems and the conditions that affect them are reviewed, with particular reference to the use of drugs to treat these conditions. Topics include muscle relaxants, anesthetics, pain medication, and nervous system and psychological disorders. As students work through this course, their appreciation of how drugs affect the body in intended and unintended ways will increase. Transferrable College Credits: 3
  • Pharmacology II - Continues the study of pharmacology. Several major body systems are covered, including the cardiovascular, urinary, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and reproductive systems, with particular emphasis on the endocrine and immune systems. The components and functions of each of these systems are reviewed, along with diseases and conditions that affect them. The drugs that are used to treat such conditions are studied with respect to their mechanisms of action, therapeutic effects, and adverse effects. As students work through this course, their understanding of the ways in which drugs act on the body will improve. Transferrable College Credits: 3

When you have completed your courses, you can apply to have the credits you earned transferred to the college or university that you are attending. That’s another way that taking courses at StraighterLine can save costs.

 

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