Lady Liberty Welcomes Students to Our Shores

Barry Lenson

Lady Liberty Welcomes International Students to Our Shores

On October 28 in 1886, president Grover Cleveland presided over a ceremony that officially dedicated the Statue of Liberty in New York Bay. As you know, Lady Liberty was a gift given in friendship to America by the people of France.

Some years later – in 1903, to be precise, a bronze plaque was installed on the base of the statue. It displays a poem called “The New Colossus,” by an American poet named Emma Lazarus. Lazarus, you might not know, was a young Jewish woman whose family members had been in New York since colonial times. Here’s an excerpt from her poem, which she actually wrote nearly 20 years earlier . . .

“Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she
With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

These days, some Americans seem less eager than that to open our shores to the “wretched refuse” of other countries. But nonetheless, America does still welcome students from other countries.  These students now arrive every year to study at top-notch American colleges and universities. Some of these international students return to their own countries after graduation. Others stay in the United States, where they take jobs and contribute to our economic growth and stability.

Are you an international student eager to earn a degree at an American college? If so, here’s a suggestion for you. Why not start earning an American degree by taking college courses at StraighterLine? They can pave the way to a college degree that you can earn at a growing number of excellent American colleges and universities.

And the good news is, you can start your American college studies right where you live now, without the need to obtain a student visa, move to America, or leave your home and family behind. You don’t even need to be “tired” or “poor,” or a member of a “huddled mass yearning to breathe free.”

Check out StraighterLine college courses. You can start working toward your American degree today.


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