How Many College Graduates Does Your State Have?

Barry Lenson

How Many College Graduates Does Your State Have?

If we had our way here at StraighterLine, we’d like all younger Americans to have college degrees, whether they hail from Alabama, Wyoming, or anywhere in between. But sadly, that is not the case.

We thought you might be interested in knowing how well your state is doing in educating its citizens. Here are some statistics that we just found on the Complete College America website that we wanted to share with you.

Current Percentages of Young Adults (Ages 25-34) Who Have College Degrees by State

  •          Alabama - 32%
  •          Alaska -  30%
  •          Arizona - 31%
  •          Arkansas -  26%
  •          California -  36%
  •          Colorado  - 41%
  •          Connecticut - 46%
  •          Delaware - 36%
  •          Florida - 35%
  •          Georgia - 34%
  •          Hawaii - 41%
  •          Idaho  -  34%
  •          Illinois - 43%
  •          Indiana - 36%
  •          Iowa - 46%
  •          Kansas - 41%
  •          Kentucky - 32%
  •          Louisiana - 28%
  •          Maine - 36%
  •          Maryland - 45%
  •          Massachusetts - 53%
  •          Michigan - 36%
  •          Minnesota - 48%
  •          Mississippi - 32%
  •          Missouri - 37%
  •          Montana - 36%
  •          Nebraska - 44%
  •          Nevada - 28%
  •          New Hampshire - 46%
  •          New Jersey - 46%
  •          New Mexico - 29%
  •          New York - 48%
  •          North Carolina - 36%
  •          North Dakota - 50%
  •          Ohio - 36%
  •          Oklahoma - 30%
  •          Oregon - 36%
  •          Pennsylvania - 43%
  •          Rhode Island - 43%
  •          South Carolina - 34%
  •          South Dakota - 44%
  •          Tennessee - 31%
  •          Texas - 31%
  •          Utah - 38%
  •          Vermont - 44%
  •          Virginia - 42%
  •          Washington - 39%
  •          West Virginia - 28%
  •          Wisconsin - 40%
  •          Wyoming - 34%

In the coming years, we’ll be interested to see how those figures might change. Will the availability of affordable online college classes make those percentages tick up? We’re betting that will be the case – and we certainly hope so.

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