Careers in Nursing are on the Rise

Careers in Nursing are on the Rise
Beth Dumbauld

Considering a degree in nursing? Smart move. If you are looking for a career that offers job security, benefits, and a good income, a nursing degree can take you where you want to be.

The healthcare sector is growing at a rapid rate, and you can use nursing credentials to advance with it. Plus, with affordable online education options, earning your nursing degree doesn’t mean you need to go deep into debt to pursue your dreams.

Whether you’re currently working as a nurse, considering your BSN, an active nursing student, or just thinking about enrolling in nursing school, you’ll be happy to know that nursing is a career on the rise. You should feel confident in your decision to become a nurse and get your nursing degree.

Need to know how to get started? Download our free guide on Careers in Nursing today!

A Nursing Degree Increases a Family’s Financial Health

According to a recent article published by the New York Times about how health care is opening a stable career path for many, individuals with nursing degrees are making a considerable contribution to the financial stability of the middle class and their families. In fact, registered nurses make up the third-largest middle-income occupation with a median pay of $61,000 a year (2012), a 55% increase (adjusted for inflation) over salaries earned 30 years ago.

According to the article, there are 3 key reasons why getting your nursing degree is a good idea:

1 - Careers in healthcare are significantly on the rise

With an aging population, the need for healthcare services is on the rise, and projected to continue to grow, taking an increasingly critical role in the US job market.

According to The Times:

"Economists at the Labor Department project that by 2022, as baby boomers age, health care and social assistance will absorb nearly 20 percent of consumer spending, double the share of manufactured goods. The sector is expected to support over 21 million jobs, five million more than today. This includes half a million more registered nurses."

2 - Opportunities in nursing are growing for men and women

Nursing students are becoming increasingly diverse, and more mature as more working adults go back to school and change careers. At this time, more women are pursuing education as a means to capture more of the better jobs, particularly those in nursing.

According to The Times:

  • More men are joining nursing, but they still make up only 10 percent of the ranks, compared with 4 percent in 1980.
  • Today, 38 percent of women in their late 20s and early 30s have a college degree, compared with 15 percent 40 years ago. The completion rate for young men is now 7 percentage points lower than for women — back then it was 7 points higher.

3 - To get a nursing  job, you need a nursing degree

To increase your odds of a solid middle class lifestyle in today’s job market, having your degree matters, particularly if you want to enter the healthcare field. According to the The Times,

"Today, almost 58 percent of registered nurses have a bachelor’s degree or more, compared with about a third in 1980."

If you are wavering about whether or not a nursing degree is right for you, getting your degree is still critically important. Here are some insight about the importance of a college degree in today’s labor market:

"In 1980, 55 percent of workers who earned the equivalent of $40,000 to $80,000 in today’s dollars had at most a high school diploma.... Only a quarter had a college degree. Today, the share of college graduates has risen to about 41 percent, while just under 31 percent have completed no more than high school."

The demand for nurses continues to outpace the supply, creating an ongoing shortage that affects the healthcare industry in meaningful ways. This means higher pay rates and better job security and flexibility for nurses. In the long term, a degree is becoming essential for working adults, and it’s becoming more and more clear that getting a nursing degree is a worthwhile investment.

Not sure where to start? Get your free personalized nursing degree plan today!

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