Applying to Graduate School? Here’s What You Are Up Against

Barry Lenson

Applying to Graduate School? Here’s What You Are Up Against

“The Next Gate,” an article by Jacques Steinberg that appeared in the July 20 New York Times, does a good job of describing how applying to grad school differs from applying to college. If you’re thinking of applying to graduate school, here are some interesting statistics that Steinberg reports. All come from a new survey of 123 graduate admissions officers that was conducted by Kaplan Higher Education. . .

  • Sixty-five percent of graduate school admissions officers say it is “inappropriate” for applicants to contact them via social media.
  • Twelve percent are allowed by their universities to visit applicants’ social media pages. And 29% of the members of that group state that they rejected applicants because of what they saw.
  • Sixty-five percent say that financial aid for graduate students has increased this year.
  • Ninety-eight percent say that there is no advantage to be gained by submitting more than one set of GRE scores. And 11% say that there is a disadvantage in submitting scores three or more times.

And some other factors to keep in mind . . .
Steinberg points out that faculty members, not admissions officers, play the biggest role in deciding who gets admitted to graduate school. They rely on grades, recommendation letters and also on extracurricular activities. Extracurriculars? If that sounds strange, remember that your character counts when you are applying to grad school – just as it did when you were applying to college.

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